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Sitting Too Long Won’t Kill You – Just Exercise Everyday

At first, it was said that sitting was just as smoking a cigarette. We then found out that sitting is affecting our muscle movement and brain activity, making our behinds larger, and leaving our DNA open to ageing. To fight against this you were probably thinking about investing in one of those stand up desks. Then, you found out that standing desks weren’t as good as everyone said. Thankfully, a new study has found that our general beliefs about sitting for prolonged periods might not be as dangerous as once said before.

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Contrary to studies that showed even exercise time can’t reverse the effects of long sitting periods, researchers from the University of Exton and the University College London found that if you are otherwise physically active, sitting for a long time doesn’t necessarily mean you are on your way to an early death.

The researchers had 5,000 civil servants in London collect data on when they sat at work and at home over the course of 16 years. 3,720 men and 1,412 women were involved in the study, and age, race, gender, socio-economic status, general health, smoking, alcohol consumption, and diet were taken into account, as well as the amount of walking and exercise the person did.

What they found, however, was that many of the civil servants spent twice as much time walking a day than other London residents, even though the participants used London public transportation.

“Our findings suggest that reducing sitting time might not be quite as important for mortality risk as previously publicized and that encouraging people to be more active should still be a public health priority,” said lead author Richard Pulsford, a researcher in the sport and health sciences department at the University of Exeter.

Though the researchers agree that the study could use more research in determining if sitting can lead to complications such as diabetes, or if a person’s physical posture or lack of motion is the real reason that sitting is considered to be harmful, they concluded their study by stating, “policy makers and clinicians should be cautious about placing emphasis on sitting behaviour as a risk factor for mortality that is distinct from the effect of physical activity.”

It might seem as if every day a new study comes out saying sitting is bad or sitting is not so bad, but either way the message remains the same: Make sure you get at least some exercise every single day.

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Nobel Prize For Medicine Split For Anti-Parasitic Drug Discoveries

The Nobel prize for physiology and medicine were announced today and it has been split two ways for ground breaking work on parasitic diseases. Satoshi Omura and William C Campbell found a new way of tackling infections cause by roundworm parasites. They share the prize with Youyou Tu for her discovery of a therapy against malaria.

The Nobel committee said the work had changed the lives of millions of people affected by these diseases which are caused by parasites. Malaria, the mosquito borne disease, kills over 450,000 people eacmalaria_2695307bh year around the world with billions more at risk of catching the deadly infection.

Parasitic worms such as roundworm affect a third of the world’s population and cause a number of illnesses including lymphatic filariasis andriver blindness.

There were decades of limited progress fighting these diseases, there was a discover of two new drugs; ivermectin for lymphatic filariasis and river blindness and artemisinin for malaria was an absolute game changer.

Tackling malaria was failing, older drugs were losing their potency and the disease was on the rise. Prof Youyou Tu looked to herbal medicine to tackle the disease. She took an extract from the plant known as Artemisia annua, otherwise known as sweet wormwood, and began tasting it on malaria parasites. The extract was effective and had a high success rate of killing the parasites.

It is currently being used around the world in combination with other malaria medicines. In Africa alone it is saving more than 100,000 lives a year.

She is sharing the award with two men who found a treatment for roundworm. Their research led to a drug called ivermectin which is so successful that roundworm is on the brink of eradication.

Satoshi Ōmura, a Japanese microbiologist, focused on studying microbes in soil samples. He selected a number of promising candidates that he though might work as a weapon against diseases.

Irish-born William C Campbell, an expert in parasite biology working in the US, then explored these further and found one was remarkably efficient against parasites.

The active ingredient, avermectin, went on to become a drug known as ivermectin which is now used to treat river blindness and lymphatic filariasis.

River blindness is an eye and skin disease that ultimately leads to blindness. Lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, causes painful swelling of the limbs. Both affect people living in some of the poorest countries in the world.

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Being Taller Raises Your Risk Of Cancer

A recent study from Sweden has suggested that height and cancer risk are linked. The study was taken part by 5 million people to see if there was a link.

The study found that taller people had a slightly higher risk of skin cancer, breast cancer, among other cancers. The results of the study found that for every extra 4 inches of height, when fully grown, the risk of developing cancer increased by 11% in men and 18% in women.

However experts have said it did not take into account the other main risk factors that can cause cancer and that tall people should not worry about this recent study.

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This is not the first study to link height and the risk of cancer as previous studes have shown the link. It is still not known why there is a link between the risk of cancer and height.

The study, which was presented at the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology conference, tracked a large group of Swedish adult for more than 50 years.

They said that taller women had a 20% greater risk of developing breast cancer while tallker men and women increased their risk of melanoma (skin cancer) by 30%.

Dr Emelie Benyi, who led the study, said the results could help to identify risk factors that could lead to development of treatments.

But she added: “As the cause of cancer is multi-factorial, it is difficult to predict what impact our results have on cancer risk at the individual level.”

It is clear from the study that height is not a cause of cancer, it is thought to be a marker for other factors that relate to childhood growth.

According to scientists and doctors taller people have more growth factors which could encourage cancer development. The taller the person the more cells the person has which increases one of them turning into a cancerous cell. As well when growing there is a higher food intake which also raises the risk of cancer developing.

Althought the study suggests height raises the risk of cancer it doesn’t take into account other factors such as smoking, drinking or whether women went for breast screening. Keep a healthy lifestyle including eating healthily, being active and enjoying the sun safely. It can all help lower the risk of developing cancer.