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Sitting Too Long Won’t Kill You – Just Exercise Everyday

At first, it was said that sitting was just as smoking a cigarette. We then found out that sitting is affecting our muscle movement and brain activity, making our behinds larger, and leaving our DNA open to ageing. To fight against this you were probably thinking about investing in one of those stand up desks. Then, you found out that standing desks weren’t as good as everyone said. Thankfully, a new study has found that our general beliefs about sitting for prolonged periods might not be as dangerous as once said before.

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Contrary to studies that showed even exercise time can’t reverse the effects of long sitting periods, researchers from the University of Exton and the University College London found that if you are otherwise physically active, sitting for a long time doesn’t necessarily mean you are on your way to an early death.

The researchers had 5,000 civil servants in London collect data on when they sat at work and at home over the course of 16 years. 3,720 men and 1,412 women were involved in the study, and age, race, gender, socio-economic status, general health, smoking, alcohol consumption, and diet were taken into account, as well as the amount of walking and exercise the person did.

What they found, however, was that many of the civil servants spent twice as much time walking a day than other London residents, even though the participants used London public transportation.

“Our findings suggest that reducing sitting time might not be quite as important for mortality risk as previously publicized and that encouraging people to be more active should still be a public health priority,” said lead author Richard Pulsford, a researcher in the sport and health sciences department at the University of Exeter.

Though the researchers agree that the study could use more research in determining if sitting can lead to complications such as diabetes, or if a person’s physical posture or lack of motion is the real reason that sitting is considered to be harmful, they concluded their study by stating, “policy makers and clinicians should be cautious about placing emphasis on sitting behaviour as a risk factor for mortality that is distinct from the effect of physical activity.”

It might seem as if every day a new study comes out saying sitting is bad or sitting is not so bad, but either way the message remains the same: Make sure you get at least some exercise every single day.

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Summer Born Children Are More Likely To Be Healthier Adults

Summer apparently could be the best time to be born. But how true is it? That depends on what traits you consider to be most advantageous. Although a recent study found that baby girls born in June, July, and August develop into healthier women than girls born at other times of the year, past medical research has also linked summer birthdays to those who have less successful career outcomes.

For a recent study, now published in the online journal Heliyon, researchers from Cambridge University in the UK investigated an idea that has fascinated humans: Can a child’s birthday give clues to their future? While we have often looked to the stars for this answer, the Cambridge team went to science instead.

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“When you were conceived and born occurs largely ‘at random’ — it’s not affected by social class, your parents’ ages, or their health — so looking for patterns with birth month is a powerful study design to identify influences of the environment before birth,” said lead author Dr. John Perry in a statement.

For their project, the team compared the growth and development of around 450,000 men and women from the UK Biobank study, a major national health resource that provides the data on UK volunteers to shed light on the development of disease. The researchers looked to see how birth month affected the weight, as well as adult height and body mass index. They were also the first to specifically look for a correlation between birth month and when puberty started.

Results revealed that girls born in the summer were slightly heavier at birth, taller as adults, and went through puberty slightly later than those born in winter months which means good health. The team hypothesized differences in the later life health of summer and winter babies may be caused by the amount of sun that their mothers received during their pregnancy — a factor that significantly determines her vitamin D exposure. However, the researchers insisted that, at this point, they are still unsure why this happens.

“We need to understand these mechanisms before our findings can be translated into health benefits,” Perry added.

Previous research, however, has revealed less advantageous effects of summer birthdays. According to a 2012 study published in Economic Letter, individuals born in summer months are the far less likely to hold CEO positions than individuals born in other times of the year. The reason for this was more simple: In many schools, the cut-off date for registration falls between September and January. This leaves those with summer birthdays as the youngest in their grade. Maurice Levi, the study’s co-author said that older children within the same grade tend to do better than the youngest. These career outcomes may be the result of early successes in school.

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Jeremy Hunt Wants Doctors’ Judgements To Be Replaced By Computers

Jeremy Hunt has made a call to make the NHS safer by removing medical decisions out of the hands of doctors and letting computers and protocols decide aspects of care instead.

The Health Secretary said that the controversial approach had worked in parts of the American healthcare system and that the NHS should go down the same route.

“The truth is that safety in healthcare is actually about adopting protocstock-footage-caucasian-male-female-medical-team-members-using-tablet-computer-hospital-rooms-shot-on-red-epicols so that you are eliminating judgment from areas where you know you’ve got a proven way that works better and allowing doctors to spend their time in areas where you really do need their judgment,” Jeremy Hunt told a fringe meeting organised by the Reform think-tank at the Conservative Party conference being held in Manchester.

The Health Secretary gave an example of a hospital in America where the production techniques of a Japanese car company had been replicated and applied to the healthcare. He said that this hospital had benefited from the new approach and that patients safety was better than ever.

He went on to argue that removing doctors from these equations would help reduce costs in the NHS wihtout affecting patient care.

“One of the safest hospitals in the world is Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle. They developed their incredibly high standards by copying the production techniques used by Toyota and this was very controversial when they started on this journey 10 years ago,” he said.

The Virginia Mason is a hospital for teaching with over 300 beds. In 2002 the hospitals managers visited the factories of Toyota in Japan as part of a traning course. It is a private hospital and charges its patients for treatment.