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Medical Museum Glasgow

Medical Museum Glasgow

If you are looking for the Medical Museum Glasgow then you must be looking for “The Hunterian”. This fabulous collection has been recognised as a ‘Collection of National Significance’. The Hunterian medical museum was founded back in 1807 and has amassed one of the largest collections outside of national museums. The Hunterian has a mission to be the central resource, allowing students, scholars and tourists access to some of the most important cultural resources in Scotland.

 

Part of the University of Glasgow

The Hunterian is part of Glasgow University and actually consists of 8 different locations and is not just the Medical Museum Glasgow.

The Museums include:

  1. Hunterian Museum

    This museum houses William Hunters original collection and much more besides. With stunning displays of archaeology, palaeontology, geology, zoology, entomology, ethnography and numismatics. Alongside a highly acclaimed permanent galleries dedicated to Roman material from the Antonine Wall, the history of medicine in the west of Scotland and Lord Kelvin’s scientific instruments. The Museum is Open Tuesday – Saturday 10.00am – 5.00pm, Sunday 11.00am – 4.00pm, Closed Mondays and has free admission.

    The Hunterian Museum
    The Hunterian Museum
  2. Hunterian Art Gallery

    The first Museum in British history to have a gallery of paintings. This museum is world famous for its Whistler and Mackintosh collections. Open Tuesday – Saturday 10.00am – 5.00pm, Sunday 11.00am – 4.00pm, Closed Mondays. Admission to the Art Gallery is free. Admission charge for The Mackintosh House and some special exhibitions

    Hunterian Art Gallery
    Hunterian Art Gallery
  3. The Mackintosh House

    This modern day looking house is actually a copy of the house that the Mackintoshes lived in between 1906 to 1914. Open from Tuesday – Saturday 10.00am – 5.00pm, Sunday 11.00am – 4.00pm, Closed Mondays, this is attached to the Art Gallery and there is a charge for entry to help maintain the property.

    The Mackintosh House
    The Mackintosh House
  4. Hunterian Zoology Museum

    Located in the Graham Kerr building, the Hunterian Zoology Museum has a collection like no other. From ‘cuddly’ koala to the worms that live in the gut of a horse. The astonishing diversity of the animal kingdom is fantastically displayed. There are even some live animals too! Open Monday – Friday 9.00am – 5.00pm and free admission.

    Hunterian Zoology Museum
    Hunterian Zoology Museum
  5. Anatomy Museum

    This museum shows William Hunter’s amazing collection of specimens. Cleverly combined to show all aspects of human form and function. The Museum allows visitors to reflect over Dr Hunters lifelong successful career as a pioneering anatomist and obstetrician. The Medical Museum Glasgow is part of the medical School of Glasgow and generally not open to the public. However you can make an appointment.

    Anatomy Museum
    Anatomy Museum
  6. Country Surgeon Micro Museum

    Located in the Wolfson Medical Building of the Glasgow Medical School. This museum tells the story of James Bouglas, a country Doctor for nearly sixty years working in Carluke. Dr Bouglas was responsible for tending to the sick and carrying out surgery. Open Monday to Friday 9am-5pm with free admission.

    Country Surgeon Micro Museum
    Country Surgeon Micro Museum
  7. Kelvin Hall (Public Spaces)

    Home of ‘The Hunterian Collection Study Centre‘. This amazing location offers innovative object-based research, teaching and training for a wide educational audience. Open Monday – Friday 6.30am – 10.00pm, Saturday 8.00am – 5.00pm, Sunday 8.00am – 8.00pm and free admission.

    Medical Museum Glasgow
    Medical Museum Glasgow
  8. The Hunterian in the South

    Actually in the University Dumfries Campus. This Museum showcases some of the amazing research exhibits rotated from the other museums. Entry is free and it is open Monday – friday with reduced hours on saturday.

    Hunterian in the south
    Hunterian in the south