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What To Expect At Medical School

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So it’s almost time to head into the world of being a medical student. We know it’s daunting but hopefully these 12 points will make the first few weeks a little less more daunting and you’ll fit right in.

1. You will be able to use what you learn for the rest of your life

This might seem like a fairly trivial point, but it should not be overlooked. The truth for many courses is that you are only really studying in order to pass the exam you’re studying and once you have managed this the information which you have tried so hard to learn is largely useless to you. This is very much not the case in medicine, with areas of study including anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and pathology all being directly applicable in diagnosing, understanding and treating a disease. Not only is this a great incentive to learn the core course material well, in order that you will be a competent doctor, it is also an incentive to go beyond the basic lecture material and satisfy your curiosity and go even further. As a medic this extra detail could one day be put into practice in a clinical situation and could make a crucial difference to a patient. When you are studying medicine you are not just studying for the next exam but taking the first steps on a course of a lifelong career which will benefit you in multiple ways.

2. At times it is hard work

Studying medicine comes with a high expectation to work harder on average than most other students. There are generally more contact hours than other subjects with practicals and lectures taking up a great deal of time. Of course it’s not just the contact hours when you are working: lecture notes need to be read over, essays have to be written, practicals should be prepared for and keeping on top of it all can be a challenge. This is especially the case as your work load will change from week to week, sometimes being set a great deal of work and sometimes having a whole week with pretty much nothing to do. Therefore it’s important to be flexible with how you work and appreciate that sometimes you will have to put in a long stint of work in order to have the time off when you need it. There’s also a reasonable amount of pressure on to pass exams. In most subjects other than medicine what you are really studying and aiming for is the best grade possible. Obviously this is true to an extent in medicine, but there is an additional challenge, which is the very high pass marks for the “2nd MB” exams, the ones you have to pass in order to become a doctor. By being passed in these you are essentially being certified as competent enough in a subject area to continue towards a professional medical career. Passing these exams can often require cramming and this can be stressful, but the reward after exams is a long summer to enjoy. Medicine can be challenging, but…

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3. It’s not all hard work!

Medical students learn to manage their time very well, which means you should still have time for hobbies and a social life. Don’t panic, medicine can be challenging but you’ll still have plenty of time to enjoy being an undergraduate, an experience that many people say is the best time of their life. The level of work in the course is such that you will have time to make the most out of other activities at university, such as sports, music and the huge range of other societies that are on offer at university. All that you need to do in order to manage these other activities is be efficient with the time you spend working and studying don’t spend a whole afternoon watching YouTube videos if you know you have a music rehearsal that evening. University is about a lot more than simply gaining a degree, you will learn a lot about yourself and other people and hopefully build yourself into someone who is capable of being a good doctor.

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4. Being a medical student isn’t all about studying medicine

All these activities that you can do in your spare time aren’t just about having fun, however. While the main reason you do them is to enjoy yourself and take your mind off work they are actually very important in your “personal development and skills”. This is, as mentioned above, working on skills that are outside the scope of academic study but are incredibly vital to being an effective doctor in the future. For example, by taking part in music or theatre you will become accustomed to performing in front of a large crowd of people and as a consequence if you ever have to present at a conference or even to a team of your colleagues, you will be able to stand up with confidence and say what you need to. Equally, playing in a sports team will help you function with other people, some of whom you may have a personality clash with or strongly differ in opinions. You become used to a position of responsibility, with other people relying on you to perform your role, sometimes under pressure. Sports and societies also provide an opportunity to take a leadership and organisational role, which once again will become very important in a clinical context, whether it is organising the team around you or taking the lead role as a doctor. Medicine is a career in which it is vital to emerge from university as a functional person who is capable of interacting well with others. This will not be achieved by sitting in your room every evening and studying the lecture notes: there is an important balance to be struck between working and having a life.

5. Studying anatomy involves more than looking at pictures

Anatomy can be rather full-on, especially at traditional institutions such as Cambridge, where in the first year you dissect a “subject” who has kindly donated their body to training medical students. This means getting involved with a scalpel yourself and doing what can occasionally be a rather gory and unpleasant task. Some people might be really excited by the idea of getting stuck in and having a really practical course in anatomy, but for those who don’t you should not panic. Most other universities use only pre-prepared dissection, which you will still have to learn the structures of and examine, but without necessarily getting your hands dirty.

6. You will make some of your closest friends studying medicine

Make sure you take the time to make the most of the people you’re at university with. They don’t necessarily have to be medics or within your classes; many people become very close with people in their sports team or society, but medics do seem to end up hanging around together. Unfortunately this can sometimes lead to slightly nerdy “medic chat” where before you know what’s happening you end up discussing what happened in the morning’s lectures, or how you found last week’s practical. This can be a good way to remind yourself what happened in the lecture earlier (no one can concentrate all the way through a full one hour lecture), but sometimes it’s just light-hearted discussion about which lecturer makes it very hard to stay awake!

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7. Studying medicine brings you up to date with the latest medical research

The chance to be involved in medical research attracts so many people to studying medicine.
For those of you who are really interested in the biological sciences, studying medicine is a great opportunity to be brought very close to the frontier of current scientific knowledge, beyond what you will find in textbooks. Your lecturers are all actively involved in their field of interest and as such it is part of their job to stay up to date with all the latest advances and studies that are going on in their area of interest. Therefore they can teach things well before they are published in textbooks and make you aware of very up-to-date and relevant research papers. Be it the latest cell reproduction pathways associated with tumours or the most recently discovered ion channels in the heart, you will be brought up to the current level of understanding.

8. Medicine is a long course

Studying medicine is more of a marathon than a 100m sprint. It is a 5 or 6 year course, where in your final few years holidays become a lot shorter and you are studying almost the entire year (instead of having three months off a year). The reason the course is so long is because of the volume of material that needs to be learned; both the basic scientific principles and the clinical skills needed to apply them must be taught. While this may seem like a fairly monumental task the truth is that while at university time seems to pass incredibly rapidly, probably because the average student is so busy they don’t have time to notice each term flying past. While this is nice as it feels as if you’re making rapid progress through your studies it also means it’s very easy to get behind on work and not catch up until the holidays come around. Fortunately the holidays come around so quickly due to the short length of the terms you can usually get away with this and the holidays are often a valuable opportunity to make sure you understand the past term’s work before the chaos of term time starts again. Some academic staff even go as far as to say…

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9. You have a vacation, not a holiday

The amount of studying you’ll need to do may sometimes seem very daunting. What they mean by this is that the Christmas and Easter breaks are simply the times when you vacate your accommodation and not a complete holiday from work and do work from home. Of course, this does not necessarily have to be true. If you’ve managed your work very well during term time and stayed on top of everything there is no reason why you can’t enjoy a well earned rest for the first few weeks. If, however, you prefer to do as many activities as you can while in residence the vacations can be an important opportunity to pay back the time you borrowed during the term. Most importantly, it’s about finding a balance. You don’t want to start the term feeling fatigued from working too hard over the holidays, but equally you don’t want to start the term not having a clue what’s going on.

10. Organisation is key

Studying at university is a real contrast to being a student at school and one of the real challenges is organising your work and activities so you’re not struggling with everything that’s on top of you. You can no longer rely on your parents to keep a calendar of everything that’s going on and instead you must sort things for yourself. Add to this the fact that a significant proportion of time at university will be spent feeling tired, due to excessive studying or partying, and there is a recipe for potential disaster. Tutorials may clash with rehearsals, practicals may coincide with sports matches or a MedSoc event might be happening when you’re meant to be seeing your family. The most important thing is to have some kind of system, whether it is a paper diary you keep with you or a calendar on your phone. Make sure you’re not the one who is always nearly missing things or running round at the last minute trying to work out where you’re supposed to be.

11. If you pass your exams you’ll become a doctor

Medical students have much less to worry about regarding future employment prospects. Bar any kind of disaster, if you pass all your exams while studying medicine you will go on to become a doctor. That’s it there’s no I won’t be a doctor or believing you can’t make it. As long as you pass your exams you will be on your way to becoming a doctor and you will be a doctor.

12. Most of your peers will be very intelligent

Medical students represent an extremely limited selection of people your age and they will tend to be both very capable and hard working. This can sometimes result in you feeling rather demoralised when comparing yourself to other medics, especially as you will tend to notice the ones working harder than you more than the rest. Remember, the people you are comparing yourself to represent the very top fraction of students in the country and as such you should not be disheartened if some of them are better than you. In fact there will be plenty of other medical students at the same level as you who are making the most out of university to develop themselves as a person, not just as a student.

Being a medical student puts you in a very privileged position, among the very top students across the country. It generally seems to be the case that medics follow the mantra “work hard, play hard”. Most importantly, remember that being a student is not only a means to an end, but an end in itself. Make the most of being an undergraduate and being on your way to becoming a doctor!

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You Are Less Likely To “Catch a Yawn” If You Have Psychopathic Traits

According to a Baylor University psychology study people with psychopathic characteristics are less likely to be affected by “contagious yawning” than those who are empathetic. Yawning after spotting someone else yawn is associated with empathy and bonding, and “catching” yawns happens with many social mammals, among them humans, chimpanzees and dogs, researchers say. The study titled “Contagious yawning and psychopathy” — involved 135 college student respondents and was published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

“You may yawn, even if you don’t have to,” said the lead researcher Brian Rundle, a doctoral student in psychology and neuroscience in Baylor’s College of Arts and Sciences. “We all know it and always wonder why. I thought, ‘If it’s true that yawning is related to empathy, I’ll bet that psychopaths yawn a lot less.’ So I put it to the test.”

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Psychopathy is characterized by an antisocial lifestyle which includes being selfish, manipulative, impulsive, fearless, domineering and, in particular, lacking in empathy. Students in the Baylor study first took a standard psychological test — the 156-question Psychopathic Personality Inventory, with questions aimed at determining their degree of cold-heartedness, fearless dominance and self-centered impulsivity. “It’s not an ‘on/off’ of whether you’re a psychopath,” Rundle said. “It’s a spectrum.”

Next, students were seated in a dim room in front of computers. They wore noise-canceling headphones, with electrodes placed just below their eyelids, next to the outer corners of their eyes, on their foreheads and to index and middle fingers. They were shown various 10-second video clips of varying facial movements — a yawn, a laugh or a neutral face — with 10 seconds of blank screen separating 20 video snippets of those expressions.

Based on the psychological test results, the frequency of yawns and the amount of physiological response of muscle, nerve and skin, the study showed that the less empathy a person had, the less likely he or she was to “catch” a yawn.

“The take-home lesson is not that if you yawn and someone else doesn’t, the other person is a psychopath,” Rundle cautions. “A lot of people didn’t yawn, and we know that we’re not very likely to yawn in response to a stranger we don’t have empathetic connections with.

“But what we found tells us there is a neurological connection — some overlap — between psychopathy and contagious yawning. This is a good starting point to ask more questions.”

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The Number of Dementia Patients Is Stabilising Experts Report

The risk of dementia may be falling due to improved education and living conditions, and better prevention and treatment of vascular diseases, highlighting the need for policies to improve to create a healthier lifestyle.

In a Policy View published in The Lancet Neurology journal, a group of leading experts on the epidemiology of dementia state that the number of people with dementia in some Western European countries is stabilising despite population ageing, in direct contrast to the “dementia epidemic” reported in some recent studies.

The Policy View discusses data from five large epidemiological studies done in Sweden, the Netherlands, the UK, and Spain that compare dementia occurrence in old people across two periods of time using the same methods of diagnosing dementia in the same regions. The findings suggest that prevalence (i.e., the percentage of the population with dementia) and incidence (the number of new dementia cases over a given time) of dementia in specific age groups are falling across time and generations.

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Estimates of the proportion of dementia cases within countries are needed to plan for the care of people suffering with dementia, yet much of the evidence used at both national and local levels (e.g., the UK’s NHS primary care targets) is based on research started in the 1980s. Carol Brayne, lead author and Professor of Public Health Medicine at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health (CIPH), University of Cambridge in the UK, says:

“These old studies support the idea of a continuing ‘dementia epidemic’, but are now out of date because of changes in life expectancy, living conditions, and improvements in health care and lifestyle,”
Findings from four of the five studies analysed in the Policy View showed non-significant changes in overall dementia occurrence over the past 20 to 30 years. The UK study showed a significant reduction (about 22%) in overall prevalence in people aged 65 years in 2011 than the predicted estimates in 1990, resulting in stabilisation of estimated numbers of people with dementia.

“The suggested decrease in dementia occurrence coincides with improvements in protective factors (such as education and living conditions) for dementia and a general reduction in risk factors (such as vascular diseases) over recent decades,” explains Brayne. “Incidence and deaths from major cardiovascular diseases have decreased in high-income countries since the 1980s. We are now potentially seeing the results of improvements in prevention and treatment of key cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and cholesterol reflected in the risk of developing dementia.”

According to the researchers, although the decrease in dementia occurrence is a positive sign, dementia care will remain a crucial challenge for many years because of population ageing.